Textural paintings for added interest

There are times where I enjoy the challenges of three dimensional textures.

I use various palette knives to carve the scene into the modeling paste (plaster). After a day or two, I made a glaze of burnt siena, umber and micus oxide over the entire canvas and dried plaster. After that, I can finally expressionistly paint my idea with various techniques and metallic gold highlights.

The painting with the baby sea turtles is called “Black Sand” and is 18x24x1.5″

The “Nautilus Fossil” is 30x30x1.5″

Paint what you love

“Ocean Sail” is a new painting that was recently completed after setting it aside for a year. It is 48×30″ and would remind you of the beauty of the sea hung on a wall. Most of my paintings are ocean related: mermaids, beach landscapes, tropical and islands, underwater, fish, and reefs. Growing up near the Pacific ocean and then living near the Atlantic for nearly 40 years, I feel that I have salt water in my veins. As a child, my family spent a lot of time sailing around the coast of Southern California and the islands from Santa Barbara to Ensenada Mexico. We dove, fished, sailed, and explored the islands.

AS an artist, I paint what I love. Last summer, I started body surfing again and noticed all the colors and reflections in and on the water. After working out problems with how to paint water so it appears liquid and also incorporating the reflection of the sky on the top of the water, I feel that I am finally figuring out how to create that feeling. Since I make the scenes up from memories, each painting is a challenge. I ponder for many hours in the struggle to mix the correct colors for the underpainting and all of the layers. You have to make a plan for how to do each layer in order to create the vision from your head.

Ocean Sail 48x36

Sometimes ideas change

I started this gallery wrap with some modeling paste over their canvas and I sculpted shapes and ridges with my palette knife. The next day, I made a mixture of sienna browns, metallic micus oxide with glazing medium and brushed that over the dried three dimensional plaster. I always let the layers of my background textures and colorings dry completely.

The original idea in my head was to use these darks as an interesting texture underneath a very light abstract background with a huge Nautilis shell ghosted into the lights.

As I worked I realize that the Browns that I had put in the underpainting were quite lovely as they were ….and so my vision changed to this more robust and vibrant painting. The last stages were tweaking a few details and highlights and adding more metallic gold to certain areas. This painting is 24 x 24″

After I finally put the hanging hardware on and a final varnish it will be ready for sale. Check out my website at http://www.linda-olsen.pixels.com

Southern landscape

Since I live in the South, near Jacksonville Florida, the landscapes are always unique. Southern landscapes are filled with grasslands and salt marsh vegetation with Intracoastal waterways and rivers that run throughout the city. My house in on an island peninsula hitting the Atlantic Ocean so I have the best of both ocean and salt marsh scenes. This 24×30″ painting celebrates the beauty of this serene painting and highlights the reflections of the moon on the Intracoastal.

“Moonlight Over Waterway”.

Moonlight Over Waterway 24x30.jpg

Octopus painting in blues

Teal Octopus 36x48

“Teal Octopus” is a large 48×36″ heavy gallery wrap. Metallic golds and some gold leaf accents make this quite stunning in person. AS you walk by, the various textures and metallic highlights peak out.

I have such a love for all things ocean! Continually designing paintings dealing with water, reflections, beaches, mermaids, tropical islands, surf and underwater scenes.

If you happen to look at my website, you will notice how many paintings I have created in my pursuit of discovering and creating pieces of art that give people joy. They hopefully can relate with my love for the sea.

Highly Textural painting of ocean

Recently I started to work on a textured semi abstract 36″ x 36″ gallery wrap. First I knifed in the modeling plaster with the shapes of the waves and bubbles sculpted into the plaster. Then after two days of drying I painted the entire canvas with a mixture of Micus oxide and burnt sienna. The following day, I was able to start painting and after many evolutions and tints and painting decisions, I finally completed this after a week.

This painting is available and would make a great piece over a fireplace or dining room.

Commission of fantasy paintings

A lovely couple from the St. Petersburg area of Florida commissioned two very large paintings with Maria as a mermaid and Poseidon as her husband. As I had not met them, I painted from head shots that were provided. The scenes were designs that I created. On the Poseidon painting, I drew several scenes up with Poseidon in different poses and different underwater landscapes. One sketch was chosen and then I proceeded. They gave me several months to complete them because they were moving into a new home.

It was so nice to finally meet them when they arrived to pick up their paintings and also to have them ooh and aahhh over the completed works. Fortunately they had a giant truck which could fit these 60×36″ paintings.

Poseidon 36x60IMG_5147

They agreed that I could make prints of their original paintings so if anyone is interested, go to my website:

linda-olsen.pixels.com

Maria in Tidepool 36x60IMG_5146

Oil paint vs Acrylic paint

Coral Reflections 36x36

As you may know that I took a week long oil painting workshop in Kiawah Island (near Charleston, South Carolina) in April. Our instructor, Bill Inman really impressed on me the value of oils and how different they are from my regular acrylic paints.

SO when I got back into my studio, I decided to do two tests and practice some of the skills I learned at the workshop. Below is the 36 x 36″ acrylic ocean scene that I did first:

Pink Clouds 36x36

On the two similar paintings, this is what I learned.

The Oil (top painting) is creamier and colors appear richer. As the paint rests on another color and blends in the wet stage, there are no sharp edges. I really liked how I could brush through a wet area and create beautiful drags that picked up the underlying color as it traveled. You could take your finger to smooth out an edge that needed to trail off to blend with the background. Here is a detail shot of the oil painting.

wave detail.jpg

Here is the acrylic painting detail:

Pink Clouds detail

The oil paints take so long to dry that I was frustrated at the process but feel that its worth the wait at times.

I plan on keep working in both mediums so keep following to catch up on more results. Thanks. Happy painting!!